Roundies in an XJ

Old 12-18-2012, 06:22 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Boone, NC
Posts: 1,424
Year: 1998
Model: Cherokee
Engine: 4.0L
Default Roundies in an XJ

To start off I'd first like to acknowledge that this is something that you either love or hate it with your existence. Some people want to shout treason at the sight of it and some think it's down right cool. Either way, doesn't change that it's a jeep nor that it is mine or your jeep and no one elses and who cares what others think, make it your own and be proud.


SO anyway lets begin.
First thing to do is to find a vehicle to get the parts from in a jy. People say cj's or wranglers but at my local jy good luck finding very many at all and the ones you find are normally completely torn down. I got mine from a 2nd generation Chevy Silverado Cheyenne.
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But there's many others than this, I originally was looking for the 70's F250 that was in the jy but found this first.

Note: I did not take pictures in the junkyard so the instructions below will have pictures from the cherokee how to take out the stock light but it was exactly the same for me at the jy

Normally theres just some trim piece for the grill covering the headlight bucket screws. As far as the jeep, theres just two top screws holding the trim. Not sure if this is the case for the earlier models but im sure its not too different.
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Take off what ever trim piece and find the 2 bucket screws. Normally just 2 but there could be more depending on the vehicle. You shouldn't have to take of the actually round trim ring that cirles the light so dont if you dont have to. The 2 screws that hold on the bucket are the ones that adjust the direction of the headlight.
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As far as the cherokee, when you unscrew the bolts dont take them all the way out, just enough to get the light out. You may need to unscrew the turn signal to get it out of the way for the circle light as well.
Also there should be a spring that keeps tension on the light.
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Disconnect it and pull the light out and disconnect the wiring. Id keep the screws and the spring just in case, I used my jeep ones but you never know what shape those might be in on somes. If for some reason the light doesnt have the 3 prong design like shown below, you might want to snag the wiring to the light also.


Now to attach the round light to the jeep is the exact thing in reverse.
First plug it in then attach the spring to the bucket and attached it back to the frame.

Line up the screws and screw them in alternating to try and keep it straight. Most likely if you push the bucket to the frame it wont look like it will work with the screw holes at all but the screws have a little degree of freedom and will be at angles once you screw them in. Also you will of course have to adjust the angle of the lights to shine right. There's a right up about headlights that has a link.


But that's pretty much it. Put your turn signals and trim back in if you want, but as I said, make it your own. My trim pieces and turn signals wont be there for long as I know my plans for it. Now if one of your screws doesnt want to catch the new light, you can do what I had to do which is to just put a washer on the screw and it should catch.

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Another note, thanks go to Barrelmaker for helping me the whole time from junkyard to installation. He made all this much easier so much of the credit is his.

Happy Jeeping!

Last edited by mattphillips90; 12-24-2012 at 12:26 PM.
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