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My tire pressure monitor system dash lights say 65 psi

My tire pressure monitor system dash lights say 65 psi

Old 11-20-2017, 02:22 PM
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Question My tire pressure monitor system dash lights say 65 psi

I recently got new tires put on my 2012 jeep grand cherokee and shortly afterwards my dash lights have been telling me i have 65psi in one and 30 in others. It changes day to day. What should i do
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Old 11-20-2017, 09:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Cindymoya View Post
I recently got new tires put on my 2012 jeep grand cherokee and shortly afterwards my dash lights have been telling me i have 65psi in one and 30 in others. It changes day to day. What should i do
You either have one tire WAY overinflated, or a faulty TPMS unit on that tire.

Take it to the tire shop. They will replace the fault unit in the tire, reset the code, and everyrhing is gravy.
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Old 11-20-2017, 09:17 PM
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Well, hopefully...lol

Bottom line, something is wrong, take it back to the shop that did the work.
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Old 11-21-2017, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by roninofako View Post
You either have one tire WAY overinflated, or a faulty TPMS unit on that tire.

Take it to the tire shop. They will replace the fault unit in the tire, reset the code, and everyrhing is gravy.
Sounds like one of them may have gotten smashed while the tire was being dismounted/mounted. Hate to admit it, but I have done this myself many times getting in a hurry and not clocking the wheel correctly on the machine first. lol
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Old 11-23-2017, 01:11 PM
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yep always keep the valvestem under the duckbill (atleast our machine) to prevent that then across the duckbill when remounting. Broke one before and man that frickin thing flew everywhere lol. But band sensors and sensors across the valvestem suck as well because you dont know theyre there until you take the tire off or sometimes seen them when debeading the tire.
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Old 11-23-2017, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by EEVEE View Post
yep always keep the valvestem under the duckbill (atleast our machine) to prevent that then across the duckbill when remounting. Broke one before and man that frickin thing flew everywhere lol. But band sensors and sensors across the valvestem suck as well because you dont know theyre there until you take the tire off or sometimes seen them when debeading the tire.
I am so glad they have decided to move away from the band style sensors! lol Some engineer FORGOT why wheels have a dropcenter in the first place.

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Old 11-24-2017, 03:54 AM
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Just another piece of non-essential equipment in my opinion. I've always kept an eye on my tires and frequently check pressures. It's part of vehicle ownership.
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Old 11-24-2017, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by dave1123 View Post
Just another piece of non-essential equipment in my opinion. I've always kept an eye on my tires and frequently check pressures. It's part of vehicle ownership.
We are getting lazier by the day as a culture. We want someone or something else to do all the work and thinking for us.
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Old 11-24-2017, 04:04 PM
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Mechanics love people who just put gas in and then cry about the repair bills.
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Old 11-25-2017, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by dave1123 View Post
Mechanics love people who just put gas in and then cry about the repair bills.
This is because of the "lifetime warranty" mentality. Now our culture expects this on EVERYTHING. When they decided to use this marketing technique they forgot about human nature and had no clue how much it was going to actually change our culture and society towards irrationality. Now everything that happens is someone or something else's fault, never our own. This concept made it acceptable in society to be completely irresponsible for our own actions. I now blame this one marketing concept for most of the problems we have in the world right now.
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Old 11-25-2017, 02:33 PM
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The problem is you and I know better, I worry about our children. Especially the ones who think THEY know better.
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Old 11-25-2017, 03:04 PM
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Here's all the old heads thinking they know better then anyone...




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Old 11-26-2017, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Martlor13 View Post
Here's all the old heads thinking they know better then anyone...




I know you are ribbing us a bit here lol, But there is something to consider in this. I am probably one of the younger of the old farts here at 56 and many of us are eye witnesses to the changes that have happened over the longer term. I am eye witness to about 2 and a half generations of change play by play and had plenty of time to figure and realize what was causing it as it was happening. Dave has been witness to almost 3 generations because he is not quite, but close to being old enough to be my father. But my generation is probably the last to practice respect and appreciation for knowledge and wisdom passed down from our elders in the old apprenticeship style of learning based on reality and practicality.

So because of what we learned from our elders, this has expanded our knowledge base to a period of 5 generations, almost 100 years. There is knowledge and wisdom we have learned that is now completely forgotten and no longer practiced at all. But even with all these years of experience also comes the self realization that we don't know everything and there is always something new to learn daily. Unfortunately this respect and appreciation for knowledge, wisdom, and historical reality from our elders is now discouraged and no longer practiced.
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Old 11-26-2017, 01:44 PM
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Yes! I learned my trade at the hands of a master toolmaker and personally trained 5 more myself after receiving my Journeyman's papers. There are no programs like that anymore. It's all young kids coming out of training in computers and CNC machining. We don't even prototype anything any more. The computer says it will work! I've got 50 years of experience machining metal and can't find a job!

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Old 11-26-2017, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by dave1123 View Post
Yes! I learned my trade at the hands of a master toolmaker and personally trained 5 more myself after receiving my Journeyman's papers. There are no programs like that anymore. It's all young kids coming out of training in computers and CNC machining. We don't even prototype anything any more. The computer says it will work! I've got 50 years of experience machining metal and can't find a job!
Here's an example of what we are talking about I would like to share with Martlor because he is in the tire business. Something I learned from my Grandmother who helped my Great Grandfather do it is changing a metal tire on a wooden wagon wheel. I know you are also old enough to know this one too Dave. You heat the metal tire in a fire until it expands in diameter a bit then drop it on the wooden wheel and toss it in a puddle of water to stop it from burning and to make it shrink very tight around the wheel.

Now how could this 100 yr old operation method and knowledge be of any help today? Actually this knowledge is very practical for replacing the ring gear on a standard trans clutch flywheel. Current practice is to heat the ring gear in a couple places to make it expand enough to tap onto the flywheel. Problem is, sometimes it is very hard to keep from accidentally annealing the teeth in these spots and making them soft because the torch is so hot.

So what I still do instead is throw the ring gear on the barbecue for about ten minutes. This heats the whole ring gear up all the way around. So even at a quite low temperature it does expand more than enough to just go drop on the flywheel with absolutely no resistance. It shrinks to be even tighter than the other method and there is no worry about it becoming annealed during the heating process.

So the point is sometimes historical knowledge can indeed be applied in a practical way in more modern circumstances so I'm glad I listened and learned.
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