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Old 07-03-2017, 10:58 AM
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So, after some behind the scenes banter, and the exchange of recipes, I decided to start a thread here in off topic, where you can share your favorite recipes.

I shared a recipe for carne asada, which I will post here, but I figured I'd start it off with something a little different. The following recipe I nabbed from jamieoliver.com, as I couldn't find my original recipe, but, it is pretty spot on with mine...

A little backstory here, when I lived in Colorado, we would go out a couple times a year to Moab for several days of wheeling, camping, and debauchery, LOL....I always made these, and they were always the first thing gone from the cooler, haha...

Scotch Eggs

Ingredients

10 large free-range eggs , 2 beaten
800 g quality sausage meat
1 small bunch fresh chives , finely chopped
1 small bunch fresh parsley , leaves picked and finely chopped
1 whole nutmeg
1 tablespoon English mustard
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
plain flour , for dusting
150 g good-quality white breadcrumbs
2 litres vegetable oil
3 tablespoons vegetable or corn oil

Often, the best way to get quality sausage meat is to buy some really lovely sausages, slit them open, then squeeze out the meat. (I use Jimmy Dean hot and spicy sausage) I like my Scotch eggs a little runny in the middle, but if you like a harder boiled centre, simply boil them for an extra couple of minutes at the start. You want the pork cooked through, the outside golden and crispy and the inside hot and runny. Thats when you know youve got yourself a good Scotch egg.

1. Put the first 8 eggs into a pan of cold water and bring to the boil. Boil for 3 to 4 minutes, then transfer to a bowl of cold water. Once cooled, carefully peel them.

2. Put the sausage meat into another bowl with the herbs, a good grating of nutmeg, the mustard and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Give it all a good mix together then divide into 8 *****.

3. Have 3 plates ready - one with a small handful of flour, one with the beaten eggs and a third with the breadcrumbs. To make the Scotch eggs, start by flouring your hands. In the palm of one hand, flatten one of the sausage ***** into an oval-shaped pattie. Roll a peeled egg in flour, then pop it in the middle of the pattie. Gently shape the meat evenly around the egg, moulding it with your hands.

4. Roll the meat-wrapped egg in the flour, shake off any excess, then dip into the beaten egg, followed by the breadcrumbs. Roll in the egg and breadcrumbs again for a really good coating.

5. Heat the oil in a deep pan or deep fat fryer to about 150C/300F. If you have a cooking thermometer its a good idea to use it. Otherwise, test if the oil is hot enough by adding a piece of potato and leaving it for about a minute if it sizzles and browns, its ready. Carefully lower the eggs into the pan and cook for about 4 minutes, turning them every so often, until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. (If youre worried about the meat being under-cooked, deep-fry the scotch eggs until theyre golden and crispy, then pop them in a hot oven for a couple of minutes.)

6. Cool the eggs slightly, then arrange them on board with a good piece of Scottish Cheddar, some pickle and a few pickled onions. Heaven.

So, that's the basic recipe, I added in the directions intro that I use Jimmy Dean hot and spicy sausage, and as usual, I tweak things around a bit to make it my own...add a little minced garlic, salt and pepper to taste, etc...

But, the best part about these is how well they lend themselves to wheeling/camping. Once you are done, let them cool down, and wrap them individually in tin foil, then place in Ziploc bags, and put them on top in the cooler to keep them dry. Then, in the morning, right before you go wheeling, slap a few of them on top of the intake manifold. Drive to your spot, do some wheeling, and at the first stop, break 'em out. Perfectly heated, and one perfect, portable breakfast. Once you try them, you'll want them every trip. I was forced into making them every time, as they were always a big hit with our groups!

Enjoy!
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Old 07-03-2017, 11:16 AM
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Here's the recipe I shared for carne asada....

This is a base recipe, follow it and it will be good. Tweak it, and it will be better. I have it down to a science now, but I have tweaked it into my own thing. That's the best part about cooking, you can take basic combos, tweak, and make it your own. I prefer a touch more garlic and citrus in the mojo, and use both serranos and jalapenos in the pico. Salt and pepper are adjusted as well, I lay off of the salt, and add more fresh ground pepper.

Follow the basic recipe the first time out. See what you feel is lacking, then adjust, and TAKE NOTE if you want repeatable results. I've gotten to the point where I eyeball it all, and it always comes out great.

Ingredients
2 pounds flank or skirt steak, trimmed of excess fat
1 recipe Mojo, recipe follows
Olive oil, for coating the grill
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
16 (7-inch) corn tortillas
Shredded romaine or iceberg lettuce, for serving
Chopped white onion, for serving
Shredded Jack cheese, for serving
1/2 cup Pico de Gallo, recipe follows
2 limes, cut in wedges for serving
Mojo:
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 jalapeno, minced
1 large handful fresh cilantro leaves, finely chopped
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 limes, juiced
1 orange, juiced
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1/2 cup olive oil
Pico De Gallo:
4 vine-ripe tomatoes, chopped
1/2 medium red onion, chopped
2 green onions, white and green parts, sliced
1 Serrano chile, minced
1 handful fresh cilantro leaves, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 lime, juiced
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt


Directions:

Lay the flank steak in a large baking dish and pour the mojo over it. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour or up to 8 hours, so the flavors can sink into the meat. Don't marinate the steak for more than 8 hours though, or the fibers break down too much and the meat gets mushy.
Preheat an outdoor grill or a ridged grill pan over medium-high flame (you can also use a broiler). Brush the grates with a little oil to prevent the meat from sticking. Pull the steak out of the mojo marinade and season the steak on both sides with salt and pepper. Grill (or broil) the steak for 7 to 10 minutes per side, turning once, until medium-rare. Remove the steak to a cutting board and let it rest for 5 minutes to allow the juices to settle. Thinly slice the steak across the grain on a diagonal.
Warm the tortillas for 30 seconds on each side in a dry skillet or on the grill, until toasty and pliable.
To make the tacos, stack up 2 of the warm tortillas, lay about 4 ounces of beef down the center, and sprinkle with some lettuce, onion, and cheese. Top each taco with a spoonful of the Pico de Gallo salsa and garnish with lime wedges. Repeat with the remaining tortillas.
Mojo:
In a mortar and pestle or bowl, mash together the garlic, jalapeno, cilantro, salt, and pepper to make a paste. Put the paste in a glass jar or plastic container. Add the lime juice, orange juice, vinegar, and oil. Shake it up really well to combine. Use as a marinade for chicken or beef or as a table condiment.
Yield: approximately 1 1/4 cups
Pico De Gallo:
In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients together. Toss thoroughly. Let it sit for 15 minutes hour to allow the flavors to marry.
Yield: 2 cups


I will also serve with guac, beans, and Spanish rice. For the beans, add sliced green onion, green chiles (diced) and fresh fried bacon crumbles, topped with cheese.
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Old 07-03-2017, 11:57 AM
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Subbed. I'm looking through my wife's cookbook tonighty for something to share.
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Old 07-03-2017, 12:02 PM
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Sweet! I'm gonna like this thread.

I'll get my steak au poivre on later to start with.
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Old 07-03-2017, 12:13 PM
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Subbed as well. I was telling the girlfriend about the carne asada recipe you posted and we're planning on cooking it tonight for the 4th celebrations.

Thanks for taking the time and making this thread.
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Old 07-03-2017, 02:40 PM
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Yeah, I'll get in on the ground floor of this one
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Old 07-03-2017, 04:49 PM
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WINGS!

From a little digital archaeology into the depths of the Digital Equipment Corporation internal "Easynet" of the 1980s comes a few old postings with recipes for Buffalo wings. (These were originally plain text forums and don't really format well here but should be readable enough.)

===============================================
<<< TURRIS::NOTE$:[NOTES$LIBRARY]COOKS.NOTE;1 >>>

-< How to Make them Goodies >-
===============================================
EAGLE1::CAMILLI 107 lines 15-MAY-1987 16:15
- < New York Times Version (1981) >-
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Food By Craig Claiborne with Pierre Franey
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WINGING IT IN BUFFALO

About a year ago, during a visit to Buffalo, N. Y.,
we were taken to lunch at a raffish but delightful place on
Main Street called Frank & Theressa's Anchor Bar. This
particular establishment, now owned by Frank's and Theressa's
son, Dominic Bellissimo, was chosen because of the house
specialty: a chicken-wing dish said to rival chicken preparations
worldwide. Indeed, the residents of Buffalo are so enamored
of these chicken wings that the city officially declared July
29, 1977, to be Chicken Wing Day. The city's proclamation noted
that, because of Mr. Bellissimo's kitchen, "thousands of pounds
of chicken wings are consumed by Buffalonians in restaurants and
taverns throughout the city each week."

During our noontime visit, we sampled the wings, crisply
fried, coated with an incredibly tasty, buttery sauce and served
with celery sticks and a special blue-cheese dressing. It was an
inspired combination of foods, so marvelous that when we made the
acquaintance of the owner, whose nickname is Rooster, we implored
him to give us the recipe. He would not divulge it, but months
later we met Janice Okun, food editor of the Buffalo Evening News.
She told us that, after weeks of experimentation, she had come up
with a formula for Buffalo chicken wings that duplicated in all
respects the Anchor Bar's original. We tried the recipe and found
it almost, if not precisely, as appealing as the food we had dined
on in Buffalo.

She gave us permission to use her recipe. The "secret"
ingredient, we are assured, is a special brand of hot sauce called
Frank's Louisiana Red Hot Sauce. We were able to find it in our
local supermarket and are told that it is available nationwide.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Janice Okun's Buffalo Chicken Wings
------------------------------------------------------------------

24 chicken wings, about four pounds
Salt, if desired
Freshly ground pepper
4 cups peanut, vegetable, or corn oil
4 tsp butter
2 - 5 Tbs (one 2-1/2 ounce bottle) Frank's Louisiana Red Hot Sauce
1 Tbs white vinegar
Blue-cheese dressing (see recipe)
Celery sticks

1. Cut off and discard the small tip of each wing. Cut the
main wing bone and second at the joint. Spinkle the wings with salt,
if desired, and pepper to taste.
2. Heat the oil in a deep-fat fryer or large casserole. When
it is quite hot, add half of the wings and cook about 10 minutes,
stirring occasionally. When the wings are golden brown and crisp,
remove them and drain well.
3. Add the remaining wings and cook about 10 minutes or
until golden brown and crisp. Drain well.
4. Melt the butter in a saucepan and add two to five
tablespoons of the hot sauce and vinegar. Put the chicken wings
on a warm platter and pour the butter mixture over them. Serve with
blue-cheese dressing and celery sticks.
Yield: Four to six servings.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Blue-cheese dressing
------------------------------------------------------------------
1 cup homemade mayonnaise (see recipe)
2 Tbs finely chopped onion
1 tsp finely minced garlic
1/4 C finely chopped parsley
1/2 C sour cream
1 Tbs lemon juice
1 Tbs white vinegar
1/4 C crumbled blue cheese

Salt to taste, if desired
Freshly ground pepper to taste
Cayenne pepper to taste

1. Combine all of the ingredients in a mixing bowl.
2. Chill for an hour or longer.
Yield: About two and one-half cups.

------------------------------------------------------------------
Mayonnaise
------------------------------------------------------------------
1 egg yolk
Salt, if desired
Freshly ground pepper ..
1 tsp imported mustard, such as Dijon or Dusseldorf
1 tsp vinegar or lemon juice
1 C peanut, vegetable, or olive oil.

1. Place the yolk in a mixing bowl and add salt, if desired,
and pepper to taste, mustard, and vinegar or lemon juice. Beat
vigorously for a second or two with a wire whisk or electric beater.
2. Start adding the oil gradually, beating continuously
with the whisk or electric beater. Continue beating and adding oil
until all of it is used.
Yield: About one cup.

--------------------------------- NEW PAGE ------------------------------

===============================================
Note 14.0 Buffalo wings - Oswego style 3 replies
ANIMAL::SILVER 33 lines 29-JUN-1984 22:05
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Buffalo style chicken wings are supposed to be very hot. Oswego style,
they can be either very hot, mild or just spicy. It all depends on how
much hot stuff you put on them.

Ingredients:

1 Package of Chicken wings

1 Bottle of Durkee Frank's Hot Sauce

1 Jar of Garlic Salt

1 Can of Parmesan Cheese [Optional]

1 Jar of Red Pepper [Optional]

Instructions:

Cut chicken wings apart so you have one drumstick and one
wing. Throw other piece away. Cook chicken wings until golden brown in
deep fryer or on cookie sheets in the oven. Place wings in a tupperware
container with a lid. Pour on Durkee Frank's Hot Sauce to taste.{Better
too little than too much.} Sauce should be seen on wings. Add Garlic
salt to taste. {You should just see some garlic salt on the wings.}
If hotter wings are desired add Red Pepper. If it seems like you
put too much sauce on, add parmisian cheese to cover wings. Place
top on container and shake, using a circular motion. Serve.

********This recipe may also be used with chicken thighs. Cut a piece off one
side of the thigh along the bone. The piece with the bone is called the
slip.*************

--------------------------------- NEW PAGE ---------------------------------

=================================================
Note 14.2 Buffalo wings - Oswego style 2 of 3
DONNER::TIMPSON 20 lines 18-JUL-1986 00:03
-< Nuclear Wing Sauce >-
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's a Buffalo wings receipe I picked up off of net.cooks:

1 large bottle red hot sauce
1 bottle oniion flavor BBQ sauce
2+ cans jalepenos, drained
4 cloves garlic

Blend jalepenos and garlic to a paste in blender or food processor.
You might want to wear rubber gloves.

Mix remaining ingredients in large bowl. this could be done ahead
of time it lasts a long time in the refrigerator.

Cook wings in your preferred style.

Cover wings with sauce saving the rest for next time.

Curse yourself for two days for ever trying to eat wings this hot.
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Old 07-03-2017, 04:50 PM
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Alton browns wing recipe is bomb. Makes crispy wings without a fryer.
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Old 07-04-2017, 01:53 AM
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I have a recipe request . A unique one likely but I'll give it a shot . I want a recipe to try to make Al Pastor Pork . Had some at a real authentic place in what is most easily described as "little Mexico " near my work and now I must have more !
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Old 07-04-2017, 02:02 AM
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Ingredients
For the Pork:
2 whole ancho chilies, seeds and stems removed
2 whole pasilla or guajillo chilies, seeds and stems removed
1/2 cup homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken stock
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano
1 teaspoon dried ground cumin seed
1 tablespoon achiote powder or paste
1 chipotle chili packed in adobo sauce, plus 2 teaspoons sauce from can
1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
3 whole cloves garlic
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons sugar
2 pounds boneless blade-end loin or sirloin pork roast
8 ounces (1/2 pound) sliced bacon
To Finish and Serve:
1 small pineapple, peeled, cored, and cut into quarters lengthwise
32 to 48 corn tortillas, heated and kept warm
1 medium white onion, finely diced (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup finely minced fresh cilantro leaves and tender stems
1 cup basic salsa verde or your favorite salsa
3 to 4 limes, cut into 8 wedges each for serving

Directions
1.
Place chilies in a large saucepan over medium high heat and cook, turning chilies occasionally, until puffed, pliable, lightly browned in spots, and very aromatic, about 5 minutes. Add chicken stock (it should boil immediately), then pour contents of pan into a small bowl. Cover loosely and set aside.

2.
Wipe out saucepan, add oil, and return to medium-high heat until oil is shimmering. Add cumin, oregano, and achiote and cook, stirring frequently, untila aromatic but not browned, about 30 seconds. Add chipotle chilies and sauce and cook until aromatic, about 30 seconds longer. Add vinegar, salt, and sugar and remove from heat.

3.
Scrape contents of saucepan into a blender along with garlic and chilies with their soaking liquid. Blend on high speed until completely smooth, about 1 minute, scraping down sides as necessary. Set sauce aside to cool slightly.

4.
Using a very sharp chef's knife or slicing knife, slice the meat as thin as possible. If necessary, place meat in freezer for 15 minutes to firm it up. Split the sides of a heavy duty zipper-lock bag. Place one slice of meat inside bag and pound with the bottom of a heavy 8-inch skillet or a meat pounder until less than 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to a large bowl. Repeat with remaining meat.

5.
Add marinade to bowl and toss with hands until every piece of meat is evenly coated in marinade.

6.
Line the bottom of a disposable aluminum loaf pan with bacon. Add a layer of thin-sliced marinated meat. Continue layering in bacon and meat until all the meat is used up. (It may pile above the pan a little bit. This is ok.) Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 4 hours and up to 36.

7.
To cook indoors: preheat the oven to 275F. Uncover aluminum loaf pan and place on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Transfer to oven and cook until meat is completely tender (It will drip lots of fat), about 4 hours. Remove from oven, allow to cool slightly, cover with aluminum foil, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to overnight.

8.
To cook outdoors: light half a chimney of charcoal and allow to preheat until coals are mostly covered in gray ash. Spread out under one half of coal grate, and place cooking grate on top. Alternatively, set one set of burners on a gas grill to low and leave the remaining burners off. Unwrap aluminum loaf pan and place directly over cooler side of grill, placing a drip pan underneath if desired. Cover grill and cook until loaf registers 180 to 190F in the center, about 4 hours, adding more coals to grill or adjusting burners as necessary to maintain an air temperature of around 275F for the duration of cooking. Remove from grill, allow to cool slightly, cover with aluminum foil, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to overnight.

9.
To Serve: Preheat oven to 350F. Remove cooked meat from aluminum tray, scraping off any fat or jellied juices from its sides. Use a spoon to collect fat and juices from tray, reserving each separately. Using a sharp chef's knife or slicing knife, slice meat as thinly as possible to create fine shavings of meat and fat. Transfer to a bowl.

10.
If fat from meat is solid, heat gently in the microwave or in the oven until melted. Transfer pineapple pieces to a rimmed baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Brush with fat. Transfer to oven and roast until completely tender, about 25 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly.

11.
About 10 minutes before pineapple is done roasting, transfer meat and 1 tablespoon of fat to a large cast iron or non-stick skillet. Heat over medium high heat, stirring occasionally, until meat crisps and deeply browns in spots. Add any reserved juices and toss to combine, allowing it to cook until reduced to a moist glaze. Transfer meat to a warmed serving bowl.

12.
Chop roasted pineapple into large chunks. Serve meat and pineapple immediately with warmed tortillas, onions, cilantro, salsa, and lime wedges. Meat will be very moist and should be packed into double-stacked tortillas for serving.

Takes a long time, and traditionally it is prepared then served on a rotisserie, kinda like gyros are... Properly done takes 1-2 days with marination. I have only made this once or twice. A LOT of work, LOL

Last edited by roninofako; 07-04-2017 at 02:08 AM.
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Old 07-04-2017, 02:08 AM
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Originally Posted by roninofako View Post
Ingredients
For the Pork:
2 whole ancho chilies, seeds and stems removed
2 whole pasilla or guajillo chilies, seeds and stems removed
1/2 cup homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken stock
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano
1 teaspoon dried ground cumin seed
1 tablespoon achiote powder or paste
1 chipotle chili packed in adobo sauce, plus 2 teaspoons sauce from can
1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
3 whole cloves garlic
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 teaspoons sugar
2 pounds boneless blade-end loin or sirloin pork roast
8 ounces (1/2 pound) sliced bacon
To Finish and Serve:
1 small pineapple, peeled, cored, and cut into quarters lengthwise
32 to 48 corn tortillas, heated and kept warm
1 medium white onion, finely diced (about 1 cup)
1/2 cup finely minced fresh cilantro leaves and tender stems
1 cup basic salsa verde or your favorite salsa
3 to 4 limes, cut into 8 wedges each for serving

Directions
1.
Place chilies in a large saucepan over medium high heat and cook, turning chilies occasionally, until puffed, pliable, lightly browned in spots, and very aromatic, about 5 minutes. Add chicken stock (it should boil immediately), then pour contents of pan into a small bowl. Cover loosely and set aside.

2.
Wipe out saucepan, add oil, and return to medium-high heat until oil is shimmering. Add cumin, oregano, and achiote and cook, stirring frequently, untila aromatic but not browned, about 30 seconds. Add chipotle chilies and sauce and cook until aromatic, about 30 seconds longer. Add vinegar, salt, and sugar and remove from heat.

3.
Scrape contents of saucepan into a blender along with garlic and chilies with their soaking liquid. Blend on high speed until completely smooth, about 1 minute, scraping down sides as necessary. Set sauce aside to cool slightly.

4.
Using a very sharp chef's knife or slicing knife, slice the meat as thin as possible. If necessary, place meat in freezer for 15 minutes to firm it up. Split the sides of a heavy duty zipper-lock bag. Place one slice of meat inside bag and pound with the bottom of a heavy 8-inch skillet or a meat pounder until less than 1/4-inch thick. Transfer to a large bowl. Repeat with remaining meat.

5.
Add marinade to bowl and toss with hands until every piece of meat is evenly coated in marinade.

6.
Line the bottom of a disposable aluminum loaf pan with bacon. Add a layer of thin-sliced marinated meat. Continue layering in bacon and meat until all the meat is used up. (It may pile above the pan a little bit. This is ok.) Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 4 hours and up to 36.

7.
To cook indoors: preheat the oven to 275F. Uncover aluminum loaf pan and place on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Transfer to oven and cook until meat is completely tender (It will drip lots of fat), about 4 hours. Remove from oven, allow to cool slightly, cover with aluminum foil, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to overnight.

8.
To cook outdoors: light half a chimney of charcoal and allow to preheat until coals are mostly covered in gray ash. Spread out under one half of coal grate, and place cooking grate on top. Alternatively, set one set of burners on a gas grill to low and leave the remaining burners off. Unwrap aluminum loaf pan and place directly over cooler side of grill, placing a drip pan underneath if desired. Cover grill and cook until loaf registers 180 to 190F in the center, about 4 hours, adding more coals to grill or adjusting burners as necessary to maintain an air temperature of around 275F for the duration of cooking. Remove from grill, allow to cool slightly, cover with aluminum foil, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to overnight.

9.
To Serve: Preheat oven to 350F. Remove cooked meat from aluminum tray, scraping off any fat or jellied juices from its sides. Use a spoon to collect fat and juices from tray, reserving each separately. Using a sharp chef's knife or slicing knife, slice meat as thinly as possible to create fine shavings of meat and fat. Transfer to a bowl.

10.
If fat from meat is solid, heat gently in the microwave or in the oven until melted. Transfer pineapple pieces to a rimmed baking sheet lined with aluminum foil. Brush with fat. Transfer to oven and roast until completely tender, about 25 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly.

11.
About 10 minutes before pineapple is done roasting, transfer meat and 1 tablespoon of fat to a large cast iron or non-stick skillet. Heat over medium high heat, stirring occasionally, until meat crisps and deeply browns in spots. Add any reserved juices and toss to combine, allowing it to cook until reduced to a moist glaze. Transfer meat to a warmed serving bowl.

12.
Chop roasted pineapple into large chunks. Serve meat and pineapple immediately with warmed tortillas, onions, cilantro, salsa, and lime wedges. Meat will be very moist and should be packed into double-stacked tortillas for serving.
awesome ! Thank you very much ! Looks time consuming but if it's half as good as the stuff I had well worth it!
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Old 07-04-2017, 02:40 AM
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Originally Posted by GreaseMonkey17 View Post
awesome ! Thank you very much ! Looks time consuming but if it's half as good as the stuff I had well worth it!
No worries. Lots of taco recipes to be had out here for sure.

Barbacoa, or offal fare is big here...not barbacoa like Chipotle', that's not true barbacoa. Barbacoa is traditionally the meats from the head, the cow head is slow roasted until the meats fall from the skull. Traditionally done in a pit like roasting a pig.

Cabeza/cachete are usually a mixture of everything from the head. Lengua is the tongue, sesos is brain, labios is beef lips, and ojos is eyes. I have tried most of them. Not bad for the most part, but the brains are mushy, and the eyes are crunchy yet chewy. Both of those are my least favorite by far. There's also tripe tacos, tendons, cartilage, etc....those Mexicans let nothing go to waste out here for sure, LOL
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Old 07-04-2017, 04:05 AM
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SUBBED! Thanks for your time, Roni! and you too, Rambler!
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Old 07-04-2017, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by roninofako View Post
No worries. Lots of taco recipes to be had out here for sure.

Barbacoa, or offal fare is big here...not barbacoa like Chipotle', that's not true barbacoa. Barbacoa is traditionally the meats from the head, the cow head is slow roasted until the meats fall from the skull. Traditionally done in a pit like roasting a pig.

Cabeza/cachete are usually a mixture of everything from the head. Lengua is the tongue, sesos is brain, labios is beef lips, and ojos is eyes. I have tried most of them. Not bad for the most part, but the brains are mushy, and the eyes are crunchy yet chewy. Both of those are my least favorite by far. There's also tripe tacos, tendons, cartilage, etc....those Mexicans let nothing go to waste out here for sure, LOL
Mexicanos here in FL are the same. There's a restaurant out on W hwy 40 called "Pepe's"... it's actually a grocery store and restaurant. You can get anything in that store you'd find in mexico (or at least one of the cooks tells me)... the food there is excellent, and yes... they use everything! lol
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Old 07-04-2017, 06:05 AM
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Who knew a bunch of jeep guys would also be gourmet cooks? Nice! I can make a fair meatloaf.
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